Indie

Orborun is the Exact Reason Why Simplicity in Game is Still Important (Review)

1 of 2

Little running mech man. Ramps and boosts. High scores. Jumps. Get to the portal. Wrong portal. Start again. Fall off. Start again. Beat the level. Start the next one. Mindlessly. Happily.

Orborun. This isn’t the most complex of games. It’s simple and its various “modes” aren’t that varied. But it’s fun. And addicting. And an hour or so later, you might be wondering how that 10 minutes turned into 60.


Simple controls for a simple game.

Simple controls for a simple game.

Orborun is a racing-puzzle game. You control a little robot who morphs into a small Metroid-like ball. The goal on every single stage is to get from the starting point to the blue-rimmed portal at the end.

That’s it. No questions asked. What little variation to the gameplay there is is explained during the game with pop-up tutorials. And truly, there is little variation. Ultimately, the goal is to complete the stages in as little time possible with as high a score as possible. It doesn’t get much more complicated than that.

There are only two controls: left and right. ‘A’ and ‘D’. Points are scored by having a low time, not falling off, and by collecting the high scoring items, breaking blue glass, and not breaking red glass.

That blue glass is gonna shatter into tons of points. Ohhhhhhhh yeah.

That blue glass is gonna shatter into tons of points. Ohhhhhhhh yeah.

The game starts players off in Haste mode, which is really race mode. Stages are relatively simple tracks from a starting point to a finishing point. Sometimes they throw a looping portal system into the mix to frustrate, but the biggest hazards are the player’s own mistakes.

But then Orborun starts to open up. Haste mode makes way for Puzzle mode, which makes way for Hazard mode. Puzzle isn’t really difficult, just a more convoluted set of different paths to the finish that get more complex as the stage number gets higher. Hazard is similar but is actually hazardous; completing these stages on the first try will be tricky with the number of traps and pitfalls to be avoided.

Sound simple? It is. Even simpler is the game’s same-sounding background music. It might actually be more than one song, but if it is then they all run together in a mindless thump in the eardrums. Because this game is mindless. Yet it is indeed very enjoyable.

1 of 2

Comments
To Top