Make it So

How to Make Tekken 7 the Best Tekken Yet

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[Make It So takes a look at our favorite games and suggests additions, subtractions, and areas to improve upon for the sequel or next entry in the series.]

Tekken 7 is happening and nothing hurts. I’m a big fan of nearly any and all fighting games, but Tekken will always have a special place in my heart, no matter what entry in the series it is. I even named Tekken Tag Tournament 2 my Game of the Year for 2012 because of how it was practically overflowing with content all the while boasting the most robust and exciting mechanics the series had seen for years. But, alas, no game is perfect, although Tekken 7 has the chance to come close to it.


Right away, I’d like to address the fact that the new Tekken 7 teaser has an English dub, which doesn’t really fit the tone of the video at all while the Japanese teaser, of course, is featured in Japanese. Normally, this wouldn’t be odd at all, but the Tekken series has adopted a certain authenticity in giving each character a voice in their respective language. Tekken Tag Tournament 2 especially takes this by full force for the first time, featuring various characters speaking in Japanese, English, French, German, Portuguese, Chinese, Korean, Spanish, Bear growls, and more. It makes the roster feel that much more alive. The simple dubbing of this teaser then gives a look at what it could be like if every character spoke English, and that loses that vibrant and diverse personality of its predecessor. Fortunately, that’s not likely to occur.

So long as Panda still speaks Bear.

So long as Panda still speaks Bear.

However, one thing is likely to happen. We’ve been spoiled. The tag system from the Tekken Tag Tournament games is just too exquisite, and it’d be a shame to see it done away with completely for Tekken 7. It almost feels like the series can’t really go back after how well Tag 2 played, allowing players to mix and match various characters with specially corresponding attacks and interactions between them. More than ever, these characters felt alive and interconnected, and that’s something I would hate to see lost on the way to seventh number entry in the series.

While Tag 2 piled on the content, it actually took several steps back in one particular area: customization. This is most likely due to the fact that there were just so many damn characters (59, to be exact). To give each one a whole purchasable wardrobe like in Tekken 6 would have probably been a bit much. Tag 2 worked with it though, still allowing for some deep customization nevertheless. If 7 carries on as expected and returns to a slightly smaller roster, there would be more space for some focused customization options once again, and that’s always good news.

But those Nintendo exclusive costumes doe.

But those Nintendo exclusive costumes doe.

Regardless of whatever outfits they receive though, I can admit that the customization menus for Tag 2 are just something short of a mess without any way of sorting inventories or instantly equipping purchases like before, which is rather odd considering how clean the rest of the game feels. A more intuitive menu design would be more than welcome to the series, especially in a place like the customization menu where you can expect players to spend long amounts of time selecting back and forth, mixing and matching all sorts of equipment.

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