Gallergy Preview – An Indie Game on Acid

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I love poking around gamejolt and looking at the new releases and their featured games. These games are all free to love just for the simple pleasure of playing games that other gamers created. There are an abundance of action games, a plethora of platformers, and many other genres that we all know and love.  Then there are the weirdos. These games are the ones that don’t follow the rules of any one genre. Sometimes, they don’t even fit into a  genre, which is my favorite part about them. These games are simply ideas, single mechanics to play around with and explore. Gallergy is one of these games. In Gallergy, you are thrown into a large room filled with square pillars that are each individually filled with abstract paintings, much like this one: gallergy_2014-07-15_22-12-47 At first glance, I seriously questioned the value of the game. What was the purpose? As I looked around, I decided to walk up to one of the paintings. A loud noise played through my speakers and scared the absolute shit out of me. The entire room was changed to match the theme of the painting that I had walked up to. There was new, creepy and weird music playing, stylistically out of key.  It was like what I imagined acid being like: lots of colors and sounds that didn’t really match, but still provided for some cool things to see.  A low hum started to make its way into the music. It got louder and louder, and then softer and softer as I moved away from what I assumed was its source.  What I found was both the funniest and the creepiest creature I have ever seen in a video game. I don’t what about it I found so odd and uncomfortable; perhaps it was the limbless-ness of it all, or the face that it was blessed with. All I know is that I ran. gallergy_2014-07-15_22-13-33 My gamer instincts told me that there had to be a way to go back to the room with the paintings that aren’t blank. My though process was that  there was no way of measuring health, so touching the creepy giants wouldn’t do anything counter productive. Sure enough, that loud sound came back and the room returned to its original blank form.

From there it was rinse and repeat. As time went on, more and more creatures appeared, making it harder and harder to stay in the magically colorful worlds that the expressionist paintings created. All in all, I could tell this game wasn’t meant to be much more than a throwing-out of an idea or a game mechanic that the creator finds interesting and plausible.  But if you are looking for something to kill time with and like weird electronic music, Gallergy is for you.

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