E3 – Kirby and the Rainbow Curse Hands-On Preview

Of all the elements one can find in a Kirby game, there is one that has never been particularly prevalent in the Kirby series: challenge. With the recent Kirby Triple Deluxe however, there was a suitable amount of content to really test the skills of players, but it’s something that the series could use much more often. In the time I had playing a demo for the newly announced Kirby and the Rainbow Curse, I got to try two separate levels: one easy and one apparently for experts. My only concern is that the expert level one still posed little threat. I know Nintendo has it in them to create an intense challenge–Champion’s Road in Super Mario 3D World makes absolute sure of that, still standing as one of the most difficult, but rewarding, segments in my history with video games.

The elements are there to make an all-around fantastic title worthy of clever innovation and suitable challenges that will keep players coming back for more. Thankfully, there are a number of ways here for players to test their skills and squeeze out all possible challenge from the game, getting way more than their money’s worth. Fortunately, Kirby and the Rainbow Curse seems to offer a wealth of opportunities to do just that with its core gameplay mechanics.

Magical rainbow path things? That is hardly a curse.

Magical rainbow path things? That is hardly a curse.

Rainbow Curse is the successor to Kirby Canvas Curse, the DS title that showed a very new approach to the series by having players draw out paths for a ball version of Kirby to ride along–attacking enemies, evading obstacles, and exploring levels the whole way through with the power of the stylus. Rainbow Curse expands on the previous game with more added touch capabilities  that are most prevalent in the more difficult levels. One of these levels involves Kirby taking on the form of a battle tank and forcing players to manage between maneuvering the adorable hunk of death while also trying to shoot down the onslaught of enemies coming from every possible direction. This is when Kirby and the Rainbow Curse is at its best.

The drawing mechanics work just as well, if not better, than they did before with the GamePad. Additionally, the demo showed a couple of the new abilities added to Kirby’s repertoire. Among these is a super move that you can unleash when 100 stars are collected that either allows Kirby to wreck any brick in his path (to find new paths and secrets throughout the level) or shoot a burst of bullets to shoot down a crowd of enemies.

As a whole, Rainbow Curse controls very well and I can only imagine where else the game might be taken from there. The depth of Kirby Triple Deluxe makes it easy to assume the best for the game once it’s more fleshed out. Hopefully it will also keep the claymation aesthetic, as it is just too damn cute. We’ll be sure to update you with more information as it rolls in throughout the coming months. For now, stay tuned and sit tight as Kirby and the Rainbow Curse is slated for a 2015 release for the Nintendo Wii U.

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