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World Travel and the Games Back Home

Travel is one of my favorite things to do. Given that I don’t exatly make millions, seeking a job where worldwide excursions would be paid for by a much larger, richer party seemed logical enough.

But what I’ve never been able to completely suppress, and it is a prime example of a first-world problem, is the longing for the games back home. It is the lamenting of the time away from the games both new and those on the backlog, and the mourning as a release date comes and goes with the game no closer to my grubby mitts. But honestly, that’s okay. Here’s why.


Stein's;Gate was release in North America today. Cheers!

Stein’s;Gate was release in North America today. Cheers!

I might as well get this out of the way: I would never trade a month-long trip to another country in order to be home for my day-of-release delivery of a game. Not only is the possibility absurd, but it’s a simple matter of opportunity. And I often hate even getting the feeling of longing for my homebuilt tower back at home.

Gaming is a huge part of life as most of us know it, but a game will always be there when you get home. Not so for other life experiences, and I definitely subscribe to the “better to regret an action taken than one passed by.”

Gaming isn’t the be-all-end-all, and it isn’t the most important part of our lives – but it does matter, and a lot of time gets thrown at it. With only a non-gaming laptop to pass the few spare hours, the ways to fill the gap aren’t exactly breaking down the barricades. “Like waitin’ for a bus,” is a well-established cliche, after all.

The feeling of missing a release date for a hotly-anticipated title has a particularly poignant sting. Add in the facts that it’s one of the latest JRPG’s to be brought over by Atlus and has seen a ton of great press lately and it gets just a little more bitter.

She just wants to play. Don't you want to play?

She just wants to play. Don’t you want to play?

Grant it, digital delivery can make this problem a little easier to deal with but oftentimes doesn’t cut it, especially when you’ve already pre-ordered the special edition. Or if the WiFi you’re utilizing can’t handle the load you’re adding to it.

Still, things could be a lot worse. At least you have your several-thousand-dollar Alienware custom-built gaming laptop with you, right? No? Just a notebook that barely runs solitaire at 60fps?

Alright, that might be a bit much. But when your modern-day tablet hybrid can’t even run One Finger Death Punch at a passable level of playability, you might get a little frustrated.

Enter the portables! And thank goodness Bravely Default is here to save the day. You might not have been able to stomach a 37th playthrough of Fire Emblem Awakening-what’s that? You could?

Yes, this game is amazing. But so's the country you've just arrived in.

Yes, this game is amazing. But so’s the country you’ve just arrived in.

*ahem.* With the Vita and 3DS seeing no end to the excellent titles coming their way, from Danganronpa to the aforementioned JRPG rockstars, it’s a prime time to be a portable gamer. But these still can’t overcome the dreaded lack of time.

When one travels, one would probably like to sightsee, to take time to actually be wherever one is. And as fun as gaming is, visiting the Taj Mahal before they close it to the public or St. Mark’s square before it sinks to the bottom of the ocean kind of take precedence. It’s just the way things work.

This is obviously a “better of two incredibly awesomes” problem, but it’s one that many of us – and if you’re using the Internet, you’re already one of the lucky few in the world – will probably get to experience.

Yes, Bravely Default is an excellent game. But take the opportunity to go somewhere you've never been before. Don't default.

Yes, Bravely Default is an excellent game. But take the opportunity to go somewhere you’ve never been before. Don’t default.

Hang up the keyboard for a week? Shut down Clash of the Clans and switch to the camera app? It’s not a bad idea. There’s a whole world out there waiting to be explored, and opportunities to explore it don’t come often or to many.

When we travel, we get an incredible chance to interact with people that are vastly different from ourselves in a variety of ways. We get to see peoples and cultures different from our own, and I maintain that one is always better for this experience.

See you on the other side of the Thames!

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