Indie

Atomic Fusion: Particle Collider Preview – Periodic Table of Arcade Action

I had a chance to play through the demo of Atomic Fusion: Particle Collider for Android from indie developer ByteSized Studios. Taking inspiration from classic color-coded arcade shooter Ikagura, this title has players collecting atomic energy of two different colors, streaming in from all sides, in order to build up them up and create each element of the periodic table in order. The demo, free for anyone to download on its release on January 22nd, takes you through the first ten elements, giving a good taste of what’s to come.


Atomic Fusion Particle Collider Screenshot

Play is focused on floating through a brightly-colored field, collecting waves of plasma along the way to build up energy. Colliding with a wave of the wrong color depletes energy.

Designed for mobile devices (both iOS and Android versions launch at the same time), the controls are kept very simple and relatively intuitive. You’re essentially required to use both hands for this game, which took me a couple of rounds to get the hang of. Either one can be used for movement – a nice boon for the lefties out there, normally confined to right-handed controls in mobile games – while the opposite will be used for the ‘hold and tap’ mechanic that switches players between “matter” (blue) and “antimatter” (orange) to absorb the incoming plasma. Once enough is collected, the name and atomic symbol of your newly-unlocked element are displayed, and a new round begins. Players who buy the full version will have not only the 118 elements of the periodic table to explore, but also the chance to create – and name – new elements from 119 and beyond., and to share these names (I believe) with other players around the world.

Here, we see a single wave of 'antimatter' (orange) energy surrounded by 'matter' (blue) energy; switching your own state quickly enough to adapt to these can be tricky, and gets frantic once the screen really fills up.

Here, we see a single wave of ‘antimatter’ (orange) energy surrounded by ‘matter’ (blue) energy; switching your own state quickly enough to adapt to these can be tricky, and gets frantic once the screen really fills up.

Backed up by the soothing pulse of trance music and the crisp, colorful visuals, Atomic Fusion: Particle Collider has a lot to offer so far as casual gaming that’s great for pick-up-and-play action. A pleasantly low $1.99 to unlock the table beyond Neon (the 10th element) makes it pretty accessible, and offers enough extra that I think it creates some value. It takes a little bit to get the hang of this one, but when I played through, I found that it was both challenging and relaxing – exactly the kind of thing I look for in a mobile game.

Comments
To Top