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[Featurama] Worlds We’d Like to See Revisited

In the gaming industry, sequels run rampant.  We return to certain universes more times than we can bear, and the allure starts to grow thin.  However, for every planet with a continually running shuttle service, every story that publishers can’t seem to put down, there is a plethora of games that get the shaft, or, more accurately, get nothing.  Click the jump and read as the Twinfinite crew discusses the worlds they’d like to see revisited.


 

 

 

 After racking my brain for quite some time, I came up with an answer that surprised even myself.  Cave Story and Ghost Trick, two one-shots that take the top spots in my favorite games, I realized, are perfect.  Instead, the one definite answer that I came up with was Kirby Air Ride, the pink puffball’s first and only kart racer on the Gamecube.

Set upon by critics and, by now, mostly forgotten, Air Ride has become, at least among the people I know, a sort of cult hit.  The simple racer only uses the control stick and A, the first to steer, and the latter to drift up and charge boost/attack.  Within the game, there are three modes:  Air Ride, a normal race, Top Ride, a tiny arcade-style race mode, and, the best of them all, City Trial- three to seven minutes of roaming around a city, smashing boxes, picking up stat boosts, snagging good stars before your friends, smashing them, and collecting the three pieces of the amazingly overpowered legendary stars: Hydra and Dragoon.  I’ve put more time into that mode alone than most other games in my collection.  Also, did I mention the soundtrack? SO DAMN GOOD.

The game wasn’t without its faults, though.  Many of the stars were extremely unbalanced, and there is one snowy level that, idiotically, renders the three wheelie-based vehicles sluggish and useless.  Sadly, there is no sequel in sight to fix these issues, add newer and more creative locales, plop in a few more stars, legendary and not, and expand the already amazing City Trial mode.  It’s been almost ten years now, and a follow-up would be nothing short of a miracle. …*sigh*…

 

If you never played Mischief Makers you’re doing yourself, no, the world, an injustice. It was a 2D platformer with certain 3D elements to it. Incredibly quirky and fun, it was the perfect game to come out for the N64 and do
something different. While everything was 3D, this came out with influence from the 2D generation. However you can still see Mischief Makers completely using the 3D capabilities of the system. In this game, you’re Marina, a robot girl of sorts. You use your jet pack boost to clear levels while shaking the crap out of random enemies while being unsure of what the hell they are. Well that’s not fair, I simply never paid attention to the story line. But that’s because the gameplay alone sufficed. Being a platformer, there are puzzle elements. Some of them even test your vertigo threshold. I’ll be honest and say that as a kid most of my time was spent taking part in the Olympics levels and carrying random baby Clancers around for no reason whatsoever.

I understand why this may never get a sequel. It’s different (albeit a good, weird, happy, colorful different) and would only succeed in Japan. It pretty much encompassed “Japan Weirdness.” I loved it. The first one didn’t get enough attention even though it’s honestly one of my favorite games on the Nintendo 64. The game’s got its own cult following though. It’s filled with people that will gladly set their ringtone to, “shake shake!” Writing this now has me incredibly sad that a sequel will never be made. Going off to play it again and cry. Shake shake.

 

 

 

 

In my opinion, I think the first person action game Breakdown for the original Xbox deserves a sequel. At the time, it was one of the few games I finished because it had a compelling sci-fi/supernatural story that was entirely gripping from start to finish. It would be great to see a next-gen title that had improved fighting mechanics and an equally impressive storyline. I’m not above admitting that I would pay full retail price for a remastered version of the original; that’s how much I want to see a sequel made.


A series that hasn’t gotten the respect it deserves and definitely needs a reboot is the Earthworm Jim series. The originals on the Sega systems were proverbial gold, but Earthworm Jim 3D on Nintendo 64 didn’t feel like an EWJ game at all. It lacked the humor, style, and most importantly, the fun that the early games were known for. I think that if a game like Rayman Origins can get enough support behind it, developed, and bring back everything fans loved about the originals, there should be nothing stopping a new developer from doing the same with my personal hero. I don’t think Sega would have a problem with it, either.

 

I don’t really like sequels. If you can’t finish a story in one playthrough, the game isn’t really complete. For this reason, I’m always hesitant about things like Assassin’s Creed III or Final Fantasy XIII-2. Reboots likewise are always tricky in that recreating a game breaks many of the things that made the original special.

I would only task a special game with something like this. Segagaga was a Japanese Dreamcast title that tasked you with bringing Sega back from the sad shadow of its former self. It’s entirely built around self-referential humor and is as brilliant as it is crazy. Part RPG, part simulation, it uses a great deal of Sega’s past to provide fan service to the most die hard of Sega fans.

It’s something that sadly doesn’t get made these days and I would love to see somebody come along and spruce up the rough parts to give us something brilliant. I’ll take a reboot of Segagaga or even a sequel, since it never came over to us in the first place.

 

 

 

 

Capcom vs. SNK- I’ve probably played more Capcom vs. SNK 2 than any other game. Total game time had to be in the hundreds of hours. The crossover between the two companies is organic and natural, while providing plenty of differences between the two universes. Wrap it all in the shell of a Capcom-style fighting game with all sorts of

different drive systems from both companies and you’ve got one hell of a game. CvS2 still holds up amazingly, but I don’t think it’s asking too much for a sequel now that Street Fighter X Tekken is out in the wild. Sure, the roster will probably take a hit like MvC’s did, but it’s worth it just to see these two great universes collide again.

 

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